Archive for ‘Recreating History’

February 6, 2012

Arizona Statehood Centennial Outfit (dress diary)

Me, 100 years ago
Me, if I were born 100 years earlier…

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February 5, 2012

Arizona Statehood Centennial Outfit (pictures only)

December 2, 2011

1860s Tunics for Young Boys

Little boys in 1860 outfits at school

The boys at the “school” display

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August 30, 2011

50s outfit

Us Girls in our 50s themed outfits

L-R Me, in the featured outfit, Moriah wearing a circle skirt I made for the occassion, Bethany in a skirt that I wore when I was smaller than she is, and mom in one of my signature wrap skirts

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August 17, 2011

1870 wool traveling dress

I made this 1870 wool traveling dress specifically to be on the cover of Walks Alone by Sandi Rog. Here is the mock-up of the cover.

I used Truly Victorian patterns 400 for the bodice and 303 for the apron/overskirt. I draped the skirt directly on the dressform, creating my own design.

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September 18, 2010

MIWW 1860s ensemble

Inspiration: the Make It With Wool competition, the wool yardage I had been given and lots of fashion plates, cdvs and pictures of original garments.

I based the jacket mainly off of this one, notice the sleeve shape and embroidery in particular


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May 26, 2010

Little boy clothes from the 1860s

My little brothers Daniel and Joshua got to wear their “new” clothes to the reenactment in Payon last April. (more pictures on my blog!) Daniel (the older one, with longer hair and pants) helped sew his outfit on my c. 1920 treadle sewing machine! Joshua wore Daniel’s old out-grown outfit. More description on the way!

March 13, 2010

1860s Corded Sunbonnet

Inspiration: I made a slat bonnet a while ago…and never wore it. I don’t like feeling like a mailbox. I drew up my pattern from the Duchess Martin bonnet (I’ll link to a picture when I come across it again 😉 )

Materials: Cotton batiste, “Sugar and Cream” cotton yarn (cording), muslin for the brim lining, homemade starch, narrow tape for ties

Construction: I did all of this by hand. Yes, I know I’m crazy. All those little lines in the brim are hand-stitched channels with cording threaded through them. The crown is gathered on a cord to fit the brim, and the curtain is gathered the same way to fit the lower edge of the crown. That cord is adjustable. Making and applying the starch deserves it’s own post (if anyone’s interested, that is).

August 20, 2009

My Edwardian Apron

Inspiration: I stole my mom’s apron far too often and decided that I needed to make myself one!
Materials: Fabric from the stash (bequeathed to me by my neighbor when she passed away), packaged bias tape, and the S&S Edwardian apron pattern.
Construction: My mom complained of the neckline being too high on her apron, especially when wearing a collared shirt. I much prefer the scooped neckline shown in the pattern picture anyway (I’m not sure why the pattern’s is higher) so I cut it down. I also made the “back belt” piece smaller because the apron was a little large. This allowed it to be tied just a bit tighter around the waist. As before, I hemmed the top edge of the “back belt” piece rather that binding that inside corner. I cut the back ties out of scraps without the pattern, so I believe they are a bit longer and narrower than the pattern’s.
I must point out the pockets–I matched the print! I know, big deal… but it was to me.

December 25, 2008

Mom’s Edwardian Apron

Inspiration: I love the look of the Sense and Sensibility Edwardian apron pattern, so when Mrs. Chancey gave me a free e-pattern for advertising them, I immediately decided to get this one.
Materials: Fabric from the stash (bequeathed to me by my neighbor when she passed away), prepackaged bias tape, and the S&S pattern.
Construction: I basically followed the directions on this one, except that I changed the way the back was done. Being scared off by having to bind an inside corner, I decided to hem the “back belt piece” which made the construction much easier. The detail picture shows better than I could explain.